Flattening the Charlestonian Curve


Greetings!  I hope everyone had a great weekend, even if the weather wasn't that great.  

As Charlestonians return to their routines and the vacationers arrive to the beaches, we have another week of Covid numbers to analyze. 


The numbers last week were the highest we've seen yet.  In fact, 500 new cases were reported on Saturday.  But before anyone gets too nervous about this, here are a few points to keep in mind.  The death rates are remaining fairly consistent.  In fact, yesterday there were 390 new reported cases, but only one new death. 


I have been tracking the death reports, and the large majority have occurred in the midlands and upstate.  One of the reasons for the increased case numbers is the increase in testing.  And of those cases, we have incidentally found asymptomatic carriers in people scheduled for elective surgery, since it the policy of many hospitals to require Covid testing prior to certain surgeries. 


Lastly, I would just like to remind everyone that the narrative and explanation for the quarantine when it began was the "flatten the curve," and NOT to reduce the absolute case numbers or deaths caused by Covid.  The goal was to slow the spread of the disease so as not to overwhelm the health care system.  So these case numbers are not unexpected, since the hospitals have capacity to handle the current cases, the quarantine at this juncture appears to have achieved that desired result. In fact, the state-wide bed utilization is at approximately 70%. 

However, with the recent protests as well as the surge of visitors to the low country, it could be that we have switched from quarantines to the theory of herd immunity!  So let's keep a watch on the numbers, and stay safe!  I would still urge everyone to stay home if they feel sick, social distance, and continue hand-washing. 

On a totally different note, some of you may have seen the funny post yesterday about breast reduction surgery.  The summer is a popular time for breast reductions, especially since many young women are home for the summer on break from school.  We work with most insurance plans for coverage of the procedure, but this process can sometimes be tedious and can take longer than desired.   If this is something you might be interested in, we urge you to call for a consultation so we can get the process moving!  



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